Why Modernist Cooking?

By Iron Chef Leftovers

Eric Ripert recently had Wylie Dufresne on his web series. In addition to a new way of poaching an egg, Dufresne shares his thoughts on why he became interested in Modernist Cooking. I am surprised that his reasons and my reasons are very similar and I could have very easily been Wylie had I made different choices. The best part of the description starts at about the 5:30 mark, but the entire episode is worth watching.

3 thoughts on “Why Modernist Cooking?

  1. Never heard of this show before, so thanks for posting the link.

    Eggs–specifically poached eggs–have been my obsession this year. I tried David Chang’s slow-cook poach (no joy), I’ve tried the “swirl” method (still thread), and the “dead drop” method (sticks to bottom of pot). This technique is brilliant. I tried it this morning with perfect results.

    I am NOT buying a centrifuge, though.

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  2. I tried this one once and it does work perfectly. I am glad that I was able to expand your cooking arsenal. The other method I have been meaning to try is one from Cook’s Illustrated which basically amounts to steaming the eggs. Their assertion is that because you have a shallow amount of water in the pot, it takes exactly 6 minutes to cook an egg regardless of how many eggs you put in because the water returns to temp quickly. I would love to try it side by side with the method from the post and see if there is a difference.

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  3. I’ve already started playing with the 5:45 cook time. And it’s already clear that one needs to start with room temperature eggs.

    However, I’m thinking that 5:45 is a little too cooked for what I want most of the time. I’m going to run a few tests today, and try them at 3-, 4-, and 5-minute cook times. I want that “under inflated” look when I perch it atop toast or salad. The 5:45 time is too “cooked through” for some of the platings I like to see.

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